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AShtin Berry

Ashtin Berry is a food and beverage activist, sommelier, and beverage consultant committed to creating equitable spaces within the hospitality industry. Using her background in sociology Berry’s focus is on creating intersectional models that use language as a tool for creating safer and more inclusive spaces. 


In 2018, she joined Bacardi to headline the inaugural Women in Leadership Tour, and has spoken at a number of conferences including Chicago Style, Toronto Cocktail Conference, and S.H.E.Summit. Berry's work has been featured in top industry publications including Bon Appetit, Food & Wine, Chefs Feed, Punch, and Star Chefs. 

In her bi-weekly column Family Meal on ChefsFeed, Berry unpacks the systemic issues facing the hospitality industry alongside industry professionals and experts. Known for her work with Air's champagne Parlor, Tokyo Record Bar and Ace Hotel New Orleans this winter, Berry is taking her experience of conceptualizing bar programs and directing beverage programs, to open her very own project in New Orleans, LA. Stay Tuned!

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Kisira hill

Kisira Hill, Seattle transplant based in Chicago has occupied most levels across the hospitality world but has fallen in love with the cocktail industry. She has combined her anthropological and cultural studies background with her work experience to draw critique of her industry and align herself with individuals engaged in making it more accessible and progressive.

In 2018, Hill spoke on a panel discussing intersectionality in the workplace at ChicagoStyle Cocktail Conference and has since participated in various discussion events around the Windy City. Hill has worked with those at the forefront of progressive forums and aims to pave a way for other young industry professionals to become more involved in socio-cultural issues relevant to their communities. She is passionate in her belief that the cocktail and hospitality industries are capable of fostering a culture of accountability, diversity and social growth